About Harris-Montgomery Counties MUD 386

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So far Harris-Montgomery Counties MUD 386 has created 12 blog entries.

Stage I Drought Contingency Plan implemented June 28, 2022

June 28, 2022; 4:00p.m.: STAGE 1 VOLUNTARY WATER RESTRICTIONS IN EFFECT for the Harris County portion of Harris-Montgomery Counties MUD 386 (Creekside Park and Carlton Woods at Creekside)

The City of Houston and the North Harris County Regional Water Authority ‘NHCRWA’ have both implemented Stage 1 of their respective Drought Contingency Plans. As a customer of the NHCRWA, Harris-Montgomery Counties Municipal Utility District No. 386 (the “District”) is implementing Stage 1 of its Drought Contingency Plan (DCP) immediately for the Harris County portion of the District. Customers in the Harris County portion of the District are asked to respond to Voluntary Water Restrictions for all landscaped and other areas:

VOLUNTARY IRRIGATION IS LIMITED TO THE FOLLOWING TIMES AND DAYS ONLY

Water Facts:

  • Peak hourly use usually occurs between 2 a.m. and 9 a.m., with a secondary peak between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Please reduce water usage during this time.
  • We can all reduce our peak water use, and utility bills, by watering only as needed; washing full loads of laundry; and using more efficient plumbing fixtures.
  • Residential water use reaches its peak from late July through August due to increased outdoor water use, but peaks can occur throughout the summer. During peak water use season, home-owners typically use two to four times more than in winter.
  • The average American home uses about 260 gallons of water per day; during peak season, homes can use about 1,000 gallons of water in a day. Some homes use as much as 3,000 gallons on a peak day, or the equivalent of leaving garden hose running for nearly 8 hours!
  • When temperatures rise and rain is scarce, peak water use in single-family homes typically occurs due to lawn and garden watering or when topping off a swimming pool.
  • Experts estimate that 50 percent of the water we use outdoors goes to waste from evaporation or runoff due to overwatering.
  • With the exception of extreme heat waves, peak use typically occurs on weekends as many people use their free time to tend to lawns and landscapes, do laundry, and wash cars.

Simple Tips for Saving Water Outdoors:

  • Step on it: Grass doesn’t always need water just because it’s hot out. Step on the lawn, and if the grass springs back, then it doesn’t need water. An inexpensive soil moisture sensor can also show the amount of moisture at the plant’s roots and discourage overwatering.
  • Tune up your system: Inspect irrigation systems and check for leaks and broken or clogged sprinkler heads. Fix sprinkler heads that are broken or spraying on the street or driveway.
  • Play zone defense: Assign areas of your landscape different zones depending on sun/shade exposure, soil and plant types, and type of sprinklers, then adjust your irrigation system or watering schedule based on those zones.
  • Give your hose a break: Sweep driveways, sidewalks, and steps rather than hosing them off. And don’t forget to check for leaks at your spigot connection and tighten as necessary.
  • Leave it long: Raise your lawn mower blade. Longer grass promotes deeper root growth, resulting in a more drought resistant lawn, reduced evaporation, and fewer weeds.

For more information on peak water use, visit www.epa.gov/watersense/outdoor.

By |2022-06-28T16:50:35-05:00June 28, 2022 4:50 pm|

Defined Area Election and Bond and Maintenance Tax Election on November 2, 2021

Harris-Montgomery Counties Municipal Utility District No. 386 will hold a Defined Area Election and Bond and Maintenance Tax Election on November 2, 2021. For more information pertaining to this election see the items below. If you have additional questions then feel free to contact us utilizing the contact page.

Order Calling Defined Area Election and Bond and Maintenance Tax Election

Order Calling Election

Notice of Voting Order Priority

Notice of Voting Order Priority

Sample Ballots

spanish (pdf)
english (pdf)
Vietnamese (pdf)
Chinese (pdf)

Notice of Appointment of Agent

Notice of Appointment of Agent (pdf)
AVISO DE AGENTE NOMINADO (pdf)
THÔNG BÁO VỀ VIỆC CHỈ ĐỊNH ĐẠI LÝ (pdf)
任命代理人通知 (pdf)

By |2022-06-28T12:59:20-05:00October 9, 2021 1:25 pm|

Electronic SMART Meter Program

The District has completed upgrading all water meters to Electronic SMART Meters! With these new meters, residents can set up an account on Eye on Water to monitor their water usage and set up alerts to let you know if you have a water leak. Sign up now!

More Info
By |2021-08-27T16:08:15-05:00August 27, 2021 4:08 pm|

Hurricane Preparedness 2021

Be ready for hurricane season. Today you can determine your personal hurricane risk, find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone, and review/update insurance policies. You can also make a list of items to replenish hurricane emergency supplies and start thinking about how you will prepare your home for the coming hurricane season. If you live in hurricane-prone areas, you are encouraged to complete these simple preparations before hurricane season begins on June 1.  Keep in mind, you may need to adjust any preparedness actions based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


Find out today what types of wind and water hazards could happen where you live, and then start preparing how to handle them. Hurricanes are not just a coastal problem. Their impacts can be felt hundreds of miles inland, and significant impacts can occur without it being a major hurricane.


The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone.  If you do, now is the time to begin planning where you would go and how you would get there. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles, but have multiple options. Your destination could be a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone.  If you live in a well-built home outside the evacuation zone, your safest place may be to remain home.  Be sure to account for your pets in your plan.  As hurricane season approaches, listen to local officials on questions related to how you may need to adjust any evacuation plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


You’re going to need supplies not just to get through the storm but for the potentially lengthy and unpleasant aftermath. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family a minimum of three days. Electricity and water could be out for at least that long. You’ll need extra cash, a battery-powered radio and flashlights. You may need a portable crank or solar-powered USB charger for your cell phones.

If you need to go to a public shelter, the CDC recommends bringing items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person. (Children under two years old and people having trouble breathing should not wear face coverings.)


Call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance check-up to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home. Don’t forget coverage for your car or boat. Remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for it, and it’s available through your company, agent or the National Flood Insurance Program at floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


If you plan to ride out the storm in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Many retrofits are not as costly or time consuming as you may think. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand the winds.


Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions you and your neighbors can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes. Start the conversation now with these Neighbor Helping Neighbor strategies but remember you may need to adjust your preparedness plans based on the latest health and safety guidelines from the CDC and your local officials.


The time to prepare for a hurricane is before the season begins, when you have the time and are not under pressure. If you wait until a hurricane is on your doorstep, the odds are that you will be under duress and will make the wrong decisions. Take the time now to write down your hurricane plan. Know who issues evacuation orders for your area, determine locations on where you will ride out the storm, and start to get your supplies now.  Being prepared before a hurricane threatens makes you resilient to the hurricane impacts of wind and water. It will mean the difference between being a hurricane victim or a hurricane survivor.

By |2021-11-30T08:02:36-06:00May 6, 2021 7:09 pm|

A Message From Commissioner Cagle


Dear Friends:

We received the following information from the County Judge’s Office on Monday, July 20:

“Today, the County Judge’s Office is beginning a process to gather public input on reshaping the Flood Control Task Force into a Harris County Community Resilience Task Force, with the goal of reflecting a broader approach to the infrastructure challenges and opportunities in our community. The County Judge’s Office is inviting the public to share their thoughts and ideas on the proposed draft bylaws of this new version of the Task Force.”

The community is invited to share their thoughts and ideas from now until July 30th, 2020, via one of the following methods:

  • Email CRTF@cjo.hctx.net and submit comments digitally, beginning July 21
  • Join a virtual focus group via Zoom. After registering, participants will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.
  • Register here for July 23rd at 3pm
  • Register here for July 30th at 10am
  • Offer input during the July 28th Commissioner’s Court
  • Sign up to speak here

A draft of the bylaws is posted on a new Task Force webpage: cjo.harriscountytx.gov/crtf .

Once the public input process is completed, we can move forward with a Community Resilience Task Force that can collaborate with the proposed Infrastructure Resilience Team, and provide a formal mechanism for community input on resilience issues.”

If you wish to provide input on this matter, please refer to the three options above and, if possible, please copy my office at cadir@hcp4.net with your response.

Sincerely,

R. Jack Cagle
Commissioner
Harris County Precinct 4

By |2021-02-25T14:12:32-06:00July 23, 2020 5:13 pm|
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